Friday, 24 March 2017

Brachy breeds - not just dogs! Rabbits too.

We see a range of common problems in rabbits which have been bred for shorter, "cuter" faces, such as the Netherland Dwarf and Lionhead, . due to the shortening of the upper jaw relative to the lower, giving a slightly undershot appearance., In rabbits, with their continuously growing teeth, which need to grind against their opposing number to maintain their length and shape, the consequences are more severe than in dogs. The front teeth grow in an uncontrolled fashion, jutting out of the mouth, and preventing them from eating. And their roots become elongated and distorted at the same time, causing problems below the gum line, such as blocking the nasolachrimal duct. That short top jaw means that this duct, the tube carrying tears from the eye to the back of the nose, is already tortuous and easily blocked. This is one of the reasons (along with the effects of front tooth dental disease), why rabbits may have tears or even pus overflowing from their eyes, an unpleasant and potentially painful condition. The effective "crowding" of the back teeth inside the mouth may also be a factor in the huge number of rabbits which go on to develop dental disease there. We see a range of common problems in rabbits which have been bred for shorter, "cuter" faces, such as the Netherland Dwarf and Lionhead, . due to the shortening of the upper jaw relative to the lower, giving a slightly undershot appearance., In rabbits, with their continuously growing teeth, which need to grind against their opposing number to maintain their length and shape, the consequences are more severe than in dogs. The front teeth grow in an uncontrolled fashion, jutting out of the mouth, and preventing them from eating. And their roots become elongated and distorted at the same time, causing problems below the gum line, such as blocking the nasolachrimal duct. That short top jaw means that this duct, the tube carrying tears from the eye to the back of the nose, is already tortuous and easily blocked. This is one of the reasons (along with the effects of front tooth dental disease), why rabbits may have tears or even pus overflowing from their eyes, an unpleasant and potentially painful condition. The effective "crowding" of the back teeth inside the mouth may also be a factor in the huge number of rabbits which go on to develop dental disease there

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